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The whereabouts of the Chinese fleet that once anchored at Ba Dau beach

Avatar of Nick John By Nick John Dec26,2023 #Chinese #whereabouts
The whereabouts of the Chinese fleet that once anchored at Ba Dau beach 2
The whereabouts of the Chinese fleet that once anchored at Ba Dau beach 2

On April 15, the Philippine Coast Guard released images of Chinese iron-hulled ships anchored at Ba Dau Beach in the territorial waters of Sinh Ton Dong Island, part of Vietnam’s Truong Sa archipelago, where the Philippines also claims sovereignty.

Commentators Ryan Martinson and Andrew Erickson of Foreign Policy pointed out that it is worth noting that the Philippines also posted an additional video, showing that the group of Chinese ships was the same six that sailors on BRP Cabra saw during a patrol of more than two years.

The Philippine Coast Guard said ‘hello’ when approaching the Chinese ship

The Philippine Coast Guard ran past a group of Chinese iron-hulled ships.

`Fishing boats really cannot stay anchored in one place for so many weeks, especially when the weather is extremely favorable for fishing. The captains of this group of ships clearly do not care about the economic loss caused by not fishing.

China is said to provide funding for fishermen to carry out similar activities.

Foreign Policy commentators have discovered many details related to the group of ships anchored at Ba Dau Beach that could reveal China’s true intentions.

The whereabouts of the Chinese fleet that once anchored at Ba Dau beach

Six ships suspected of belonging to the Chinese maritime militia, including Yuexinhuiyu 60138 and 60139, anchored at Ba Dau Bank in Vietnam’s Spratly Islands on March 27.

`This is a noteworthy point, because the maritime militia of Guangdong province is often said to not have much of a role in the East Sea, unlike forces from Hainan or Guangxi. This concept needs to change,`

In November 2013, Major General Gai Longyun, commander of the Guangdong Military Region, visited the province’s Taishan city to convey the new focus from the central government.

Within months, the Guangdong Military Region began using `mobilized reserve forces`, including militia, to participate in the `struggle` at sea.

Behind them, in the second and third lines, are the Chinese coast guard and navy.

In the group of 6 Chinese ships anchored at Batou beach, two ships have the numbers Yuexinhuiyu 60138 and Yuexinhuiyu 60139, meaning they are registered in Xinhui district, Jiangmen city, Guangdong.

The two vessels are equipped with automatic identification system transceivers, meaning their movements can be tracked, at least some of the time.

This site is located on the Yamen Canal, just below the coast of Macao.

Chinese records confirm that Yuexinhuiyu 60138 and 60139 are both fishing vessels.

In 2019, 6 ships from this fleet were said to have operated in Vietnam’s Truong Sa archipelago.

The whereabouts of the Chinese fleet that once anchored at Ba Dau beach

Three weeks of presence of more than 200 Chinese fishing vessels in the East Sea

Three weeks of presence of more than 200 Chinese fishing vessels in the East Sea.

Commentators Martinson and Erickson predict that if this year’s operations are similar to 2019, Yuexinhuiyu 60138 and 60139 will make 3 or 4 trips to Truong Sa.

According to commentators, Tan Hoi district has supported PAFMM forces for at least two decades.

The militia attracted attention in China in December 2014, when the PLA Daily published images of PAFMM Xinhui forces receiving `tactical training`, meaning with weapons, while on

By 2016, Tan Hoi established a `far sea` militia, a term used to refer to the area around the Spratly Islands.

Thus, from just two ships, observers have obtained a lot of valuable new information about PAFMM’s activities in the East Sea, such as the frequency and duration of operations, and the support of the Chinese government.

`The remaining 4 Guangdong ships at Ba Dau Beach will also have biographies, helping to provide more information about the organization and activities of PAFMM. In fact, all information about the fishing fleet, militia or force

They also concluded that with only open sources of information, China’s argument about the presence of the group of ships at Ba Dau Beach has been refuted.

`The Philippines has a clear policy change when it shares an unprecedented amount of information about China’s activities in the East Sea. Although Manila’s motives are unclear, this new transparency is opening up opportunities to find

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